MUM alumnus Narayana Windenberger

At FoodChain ID with former boss David Carter

In Chicago with his team of consultants after delivering a training session in advanced analytics using Excel

With his parents and two siblings, all MUM graduates (from left to right: Claude, Aurelien, Nicole, Sabine, and Narayana)

Narayana Windenberger has been attracted to computers ever since he was a child. Growing up in Fairfield he learned programming languages for fun, and in high school started a business repairing computers. As his interest also grew in math and finance, he decided to major in business at MUM.

“I am glad I studied business,” he said. “It’s something a lot of people are looking for in the industry. They want someone who understands financial principles, marketing, and operations, but is also good with tech.”

Narayana graduated as valedictorian in 2008 and also earned an MBA degree from MUM in 2009. Soon after graduating he got a position at FoodChain ID in Fairfield. As an analyst his work included creating financial reports, and over time he mastered more and more data analysis tools, advancing to business intelligence manager.

While conducting research to solve certain problems in the spreadsheet software Microsoft Excel, he came across the company PowerPivotPro, offering training and consulting services on a more sophisticated and advanced suite of tools for generating reports called PowerPivot and PowerBI. He kept studying the company and its data analysis techniques, and when they had a job opening he applied. After a difficult test and a round of interviews he was hired as principal consultant.

Fortunately, all of the company’s employees work remotely, so Narayana didn’t have to relocate. He travels to meet clients and then returns to Fairfield to build customized reporting packages and dashboards that make the jobs of CEOs and other decision-makers easier. He enjoys the challenge of assisting different industries and reapplying the patterns he has discovered to solve their problems.

Working from home helps Narayana maintain a balanced routine, which he finds valuable. “MUM gave me a perspective of balance,” he said. “There is every incentive to work as many hours as possible, but after seven or eight hours my ability to creatively solve problems goes to zero.” He also says that solutions often arise from the settled state of mind he enjoys while practicing the Transcendental Meditation®technique.

In the future, Narayana hopes to create a business in Fairfield that services the whole country and brings more wealth to the local community.